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Life in the hottest place on the planet: Stepping out into the street is like entering an oven, only more than 300 people live here

This place once reached the highest temperature of up to 54 degrees Celsius, equivalent to the heat in a steak. However, more than 300 people living here still go out to work, socialize, and even exercise outside.

With an average temperature of about 50 degrees Celsius in August, Death Valley, located between the US states of California and Nevada, is one of the hottest regions in the world. Only 300 people currently live in the area, most of them employees of Death Valley National Park and local hotels.

With an average daytime temperature of nearly 49 degrees Celsius, Death Valley is one of the hottest regions in the world.

Death Valley once reached the highest temperature of 54 degrees Celsius, equal to the temperature inside a steak. However, for residents living near Furnace Creek Station, the area that reached this record temperature, thought it was normal. Brandi Stewart, a longtime resident of the area, says most days in July and August are so hot you’ll feel like you’re in an oven.

Get used to the heat

”The weather is quite hot. As soon as you step outside, you will immediately feel the heat and dryness on your skin and you won’t realize your body sweats because it evaporates so quickly,” Stewart shared.

The 300-400 inhabitants of Death Valley experienced heat levels of more than 43-51 degrees Celsius during August. However, despite the scorching sun, they still worked, socialized and even is exercise outside.

Children hold a cupcake sale at the Cow Creek complex.

Sharing with Insider, Patrick Taylor said his first summer here was “quite difficult”. When the body is not adapted to the high temperature, the body will sweat a lot and become exhausted before it leads to a stroke. However, most human bodies will be able to adapt after a few weeks.

Taylor thinks it took him and everyone here about a year to adjust to the extreme heat here. This man has lived here for 5 years now.

Not everyone can adapt to the scorching heat here

“I don’t know if you can imagine living at 51 degrees Celsius, but it’s not really that scary,” he said.

In addition, Stewart said he was used to the extreme heat here. “A few friends of mine have said they wear shorts and T-shirts when it’s over 26 degrees Celsius outside,” says Stewart. “With that temperature, I’d probably have to wear long pants and a long-sleeve shirt.”

Community of people living in Death Valley

Cow Creek, Timbisha Shoshone and Stove Wells are three communities living in Death Valley. These places are far from the center. The nearest town is an hour’s drive away. Some local children have to ride the bus for an hour to get to school.

The Cow Creek complex has about 80 houses located next to each other. It has a gym, playground and district library. Most homes are equipped with conventional air conditioners and coolers that push out hot, dry air.

However, not all people use these 2 cooling tools. “Some families never use air conditioning if the indoor temperature has not exceeded 35 degrees Celsius to save electricity.” Taylor said.

Sharing more, this man said that most residents here do not like people to visit in the summer. Most of the neighbors here spend time together.

Relatives of Death Valley residents don’t like to visit them in the summer, so it’s mostly neighbors who spend time together. About 150 National Park Service staff in the area have formed community groups for activities such as book clubs, crafts, jogging. They run outdoors even in the hottest July.

About 150 National Park Service employees have formed groups for activities such as reading clubs, crafts, jogging… Death Valley residents will be jogging outdoors even in the hot July. Taylor said they never tell visitors to run in Death Valley in the summer. However, if you do it every day, the body is used to running in 43 degrees Celsius, then nearly 50 degrees Celsius does not make much difference.

Residents must take precautions when going out

In the summer, the heat of Death Valley makes even simple activities dangerous. Taylor and her family never leave the house without a backup satellite phone, in case the signal goes out.

Brandi Stewart bakes cookies in the car with outdoor heat

Stewart never drove to the grocery store alone without a large water bottle. She also always checks her car constantly to avoid breaking down in the middle of the road or getting stuck in remote places. “My biggest fear is that the car has a problem in the middle of the road,” she shared.

Taylor and Stewart say they are both reminding visitors to the site to adhere to the same measures.

Taylor said they never tell visitors to run in Death Valley in the summer. But if doing it every day, the body is used to running in conditions of more than 48 degrees Celsius, then nearly 50 degrees Celsius is not much of a difference.

Climate change makes life in Death Valley harsher

People here are facing the threat of climate change. Six of the 10 hottest months on record have occurred in the past 20 years in Death Valley. In July 2018, the area set a world record for the hottest month with an average temperature of about 42 degrees Celsius.

However, people still pay attention to inclement weather when outdoor activities. In the summer, the heat of Death Valley makes even simple activities dangerous. Taylor and her family never leave the house without a backup satellite phone, in case the signal goes out.

The change in temperature makes it more difficult to connect with fellow residents. They can’t go out and socialize as much as before. In the past, barbecues would be held every month. Now, it’s too hot for residents to gather once every 4-5 months.

Photos of curious tourists coming to this land to travel: